New Zealand women footballers rebel against national coach

By STEVE McMORRAN

AP Sports Writer

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) Only weeks after New Zealand Football made headlines by signing a revolutionary equal pay deal with its female players, the organization is facing a mutiny by members of its women's team against the national coach.

New Zealand Football confirmed on Tuesday it had received a letter signed by a number of New Zealand players complaining about the methods and tactics employed by Austria-born coach Andreas Heraf.

The complaints follow the New Zealand team's recent 3-1 loss at home to Japan. Heraf angered his players, and fans of the Football Ferns national team, by taking an entirely defensive game plan into the rare home international.

Heraf then further angered his players with comments defending his approach.

He said there was "a big difference in quality" between the New Zealand and Japanese players and that New Zealand "will never have that quality" to compete with top teams like Japan. He said the scoreline might have been 8-0 if New Zealand had not adopted a defensive approach.

One of New Zealand's leading players, United States-based Abby Erceg, retired after playing 132 matches for New Zealand, citing Heraf's approach in previous international matches.

She later told New Zealand media: "I couldn't stand to wear that (national symbol) on my chest any more when his vision was to cower in a corner and not get beat by too much."

New Zealand Football defended Heraf against the media and public criticism but admitted his comments were "strange" and "wrong" and did not accurately reflect his views. Heraf later apologized and said he had not expressed himself clearly.

But efforts to dampen the controversy have failed. New Zealand Football said in a statement it had "received a letter from the NZ Professional Footballers Association (NZPFA) last night with a number of complaints from the players of the Football Ferns."

The mutiny comes only weeks after New Zealand gained international headlines for a deal which gives female pay parity with their male counterparts.

New Zealand Football signed the deal which provided female players with equal match payments, travel arrangements and prize money.

At the time, New Zealand women's captain Ali Riley said the deal meant New Zealand would "be able to compete against the top teams, to be able to do well at a World Cup and the Olympics - this is what we needed."

Updated June 18, 2018

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